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Believe it or not (we find it hard to), we have the same great-great-great-grandfather. We discovered it while doing our family history. Ephriam Mecham is our shared relative who was born in 1803. Here is our lineage back to Adam. Be sure to note where our lines cross. It sure does cut a bunch of time out of doing research!


From the beginning:

1. Adam + Eve
Children: Cain ben, Abel ben, Seth ben, Azura bint-
     begin here - http://homepage.mac.com/james_keller/PS68/PS68_094.HTML
2. Seth -
Seth ben ADAM + Azura bint ADAM
3. Enos -
Enosh "Enos" ben SETH + Noam bint SETH
4. Cainan -
Kenan "Cainan" ben ENOS + Mualeleth bint ENOS
5. Mahalaleel -
Mahalalel "Mahalaleel" ben CAINAN + Dinah bint BARAKIEL
6. Jared -
Jared ben MAHALALEEL + Baraka bint RASHUJAL
7. Enoch -
Enoch ben JARED + Edna bint DANIEL
8. Methuselah -
Methuselah ben ENOCH + Edna bint AZRIAL
9. Lamech -
Lamech ben METHUSELAH + Betenos "Ashmua" BINT BARAKIIL
10. Noah -
Noah ben LAMECH + Emzara "Naamah" bint RAKE'EL
11. Shem -
Shem "Sceaf Sam" ben NOAH + Sedeqetelebab bint ELIAKIM
According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, furthermore, Sceaf was born in Noah's ark, a non-Biblical son of Noah, and the account continues with the ancestry of Noah up to Adam as found in Genesis. It may be that a Christian scribe misunderstood a variant account in which Sceaf floated to shore in a chest or ark. WILLIAM OF MALMESBURY in his Gesta Regum Anglorum (1125) combines both versions making Scyld son of Sceaf and Sceaf son of Heremod, but then traces Heremod's ancestry up to Strephius, son of Noah, born in the Ark, who is obviously Sceaf appearing a second time with corrupt name. Asser, a Welsh monk who became Bishop of Sherborne in the 890s, in his Life of Alfred repeats the listing of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for this section of his genealogy except that he replaces Sceaf altogether with the name Seth and mentions nothing about him being born in the Ark. Some modern translations emend Seth to Shem who was son of Noah in the Genesis account. According to other theories, Scef/Sheaf is nothing else than another version of "Japhet". See Bibliography for further reading. - http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/492160
12. Arphaxad -
Arphaxad "Arfakhshadh" ben SHEM "King of Arrapachtis" + Rasueja bint ELAM
13. Salah -
Shelah "Salah" "King of Babylon" + Mu'ak bint KESED
14. Eber -
Eber "Aybar" "Abhar Abin" ben SHELAH "King of Babylon"
Legend says that Eber refused to help with the building of the Tower of Babel, so his language was not confused when it fell. He and his family alone retained the original human language, called lingua humana in Latin or Gortighern. After this, the language was called Hebrew, named after Eber.
15. Peleg -
Pelag "Falikh" ben ABIN "King of Babylon"
16. Reu -
Reu "Ra'u" ben PELEG "King of Lagash"
17. Serug -
Serug "Saragh" ben REU "King of Ur & Agade" + Melka bint KABER
18. Nahor -
Nahor ben SERUG "King of Ur & Agade"
19. Terah -
Terah "Terih" ben NAHOR "King of Agade" + Maria / + Amthelo "of Agade"
20. Abraham  -
Abraham "Ibrahim" ben TERAH + Hager "the Egyptian" / + Sarai "Sarah" bint HARAN "Princess" / + Keturah
21. Isaac -
Isaac ben ABRAHAM + Rebekah "Rebecca" bint BETHUEL
22. Jacob -
Jacob ben ISAAC "King of Goshen" + Zilpah / + Bilhah / + Leah bint LEBAN
23. Judah -
Judah ben JACOB + Shua "of Canaan" / + Tamar bint ATLAS
24. Zarah -
Zerah "of the Judahites" ben JUDAH (1738bc-1638bc) + Electra
25. Darda (or Dardanus) -
Dara Dardaius "of the Judahites" ben ZEHRAH "King of Acadia" (~1519bc-~1414bc) + Bateia Basia Illium "of Teucria"
26. Erichthonius -
Erichthonius "King of Acadia" (-~1368bc) + Astyocho Astoche "of Acadia"
27. Tros -
Tros "of Acadia" "King of Troy" (1281 BC -____) + Callirhot Callirhoe
28. Ilus -
Ilus "King of Troy" + Eurydice "of Troy"
29. Laomedon -
Laomedon "King of Troy" (~1300bc-~1237bc) + Strymo "of Troy"
30. Priam, King of Troy -
'Priam' Pordarces "High King of Troy" (1250-1185 BC) + Arisbe / + Hecuba "of Phrygia" / +  Laothoe / + Castianeira "of Aesyme" / + (Unnamed) / + (Unnamed) / + (Unnamed) / + (Unnamed)
Tithonis, King of Troy
Discrepancy between these two names - however, both are sons of Laomedon
31. Memnon (married Troana "of Troy," daughter of Priam) -
Memnon "Munon" "of Troy" "King of Ethiopia" (1250bc-1183bc) + Troana "of Troy"
32. Tror (Thor) -
Thor "Tror" "King of Thrace" + Sibil "Sif"
33. Vingener - ?? mistaken entry
34. Hloritha -
Loridi "Hloritha"
35. Einridi -
Einridi (1100bc-)
36. Vingethorr -
Vingethor
37. Vingener -
Vingener
38. Moda -
Moda "Mode"
39. Magi -
Maji "Magi"
40. Seskef -
Sceaf of Asgard, King of Denmark (0700 BC)
41. Bedweg -
Bedwig of Asgard
42. Hwala -
Hwala of Asgard
43. Athra -
Hathra of Asgard
44. Itormann -
Itermon of Asgard
45. Heremod -
Heremod of Asgard
46. Sceaf -
Sceaf - ???
47. Scealdea -
Sceldwa of Asgard -
Scealdea Skjold
48. Beowa -
Beaw Beowa "Bjaf"of Asgard
49. Tecti -
Taetwa Tecti of Asgard
50. Geata -
Geata Jat of Asgard
51. Godwulf -
Godwulf  "Gudolfr" of Asgard
52. Flocwald - ?? mistaken entry
53. Finn -
Finn (~0130-____)
Frithuwulf
54. Fredulf -
Frealaf "Friallaf Froethelaf" (~0160-)
55. Fredalaf -
Frithuwald "Bor" (~0190-) + Beltsea "of Asgard"
56. Woden (or Odin) -
Odin, King of Sweden (0215-____) + Frigg "Frigida Frea"
A whole saga existed about the Scyldingas/Skjoldungar, the SKJOLDUNGA SAGA. Parts of it survive in the Flatey Book and we have Arngrímur Jónsson's Latin abstract of the sögu-brot (fragment) of the Skjoldunga Saga. It says that the warlord Odin, coming from Asia, gained dominion over Northern Europe, giving Sweden to his son Yngvi and Denmark to his son Skjoldr. So the rulers of Sweden are called Ynglings and the rulers of Denmark are called Scyldings. - [1]
     The country east of the Tanaquisl in Asia was called Asaland, or Asaheim, and the chief city in that land was called Asgaard. In that city was a chief called Odin, and it was a great place for sacrifice. It was the custom there that twelve temple priests should both direct the sacrifices, and also judge the people. They were called Diar, or Drotner, and all the people served and obeyed them. Odin was a great and very far-travelled warrior, who conquered many kingdoms, and so successful was he that in every battle the victory was on his side. It was the belief of his people that victory belonged to him in every battle. It was his custom when he sent his men into battle, or on any expedition, that he first laid his hand upon their heads, and called down a blessing upon them; and then they believed their undertaking would be successful. His people also were accustomed, whenever they fell into danger by land or sea, to call upon his name; and they thought that always they got comfort and aid by it, for where he was they thought help was near. Often he went away so far that he passed many seasons on his journeys.
     Odin went out with a great army against the Vanaland people; but they were well prepared, and defended their land; so that victory was changeable, and they ravaged the lands of each other, and did great damage. They tired of this at last, and on both sides appointed a meeting for establishing peace, made a truce, and exchanged hostages. The Vanaland people sent their best men, Njord the Rich, and his son Frey. The people of Asaland sent a man called Hone, whom they thought well suited to be a chief, as he was a stout and very handsome man; and with him they sent a man of great understanding called Mime. On the other side, the Vanaland people sent the wisest man in their community, who was called Kvase. Now, when Hone came to Vanaheim he was immediately made a chief, and Mime came to him with good counsel on all occasions. But when Hone stood in the Things or other meetings, if Mime was not near him, and any difficult matter was laid before him, he always answered in one way - "Now let others give their advice"; so that the Vanaland people got a suspicion that the Asaland people had deceived them in the exchange of men. They took Mime, therefore, and beheaded him, and sent his head to the Asaland people. Odin took the head, smeared it with herbs so that it should not rot, and sang incantations over it. Thereby he gave it the power that it spoke to him, and discovered to him many secrets. Odin placed Njord and Frey as priests of the sacrifices, and they became Diar of the Asaland people. Njord's daughter Freya was priestess of the sacrifices, and first taught the Asaland people the magic art, as it was in use and fashion among the Vanaland people. While Njord was with the Vanaland people he had taken his own sister in marriage, for that was allowed by their law; and their children were Frey and Freya. But among the Asaland people it was forbidden to intermarry with such near relations.
     There goes a great mountain barrier from north-east to south-west, which divides the Greater Swithiod from other kingdoms. South of this mountain ridge it is not far to Turkland, where Odin had great possessions. In those times the Roman chiefs went wide around in the world, subduing to themselves all people; and on this account many chiefs fled from their domains. But Odin having foreknowledge, and magic-sight, knew that his posterity would come to settle and dwell in the northern half of the world. He therefore set his brothers Ve and Vilje over Asgaard; and he himself, with all the gods and a great many other people, wandered out, first westward to Gardarike, and then south to Saxland. He had many sons; and after having subdued an extensive kingdom in Saxland, he set his sons to rule the country. He himself went northwards to the sea, and took up his abode in an island which is called Odins in Fyen. Then he sent Gefion across the sound to the north to discover new countries; and she came to King Gylve, who gave her a ploughgate of land. Then she went to Jotunheim, and bore four sons to a giant, and transformed them into a yoke of oxen. She yoked them to a plough, and broke out the land into the ocean right opposite to Odins. This land was called Sealand, and there she afterwards settled and dwelt. Skjold, a son of Odin, married her, and they dwelt at Leidre. Where the ploughed land was is a lake or sea called Laage. In the Swedish land the fjords of Laage correspond to the nesses in Sealand. Brage the Old sings of it.
     When Odin of Asaland came to the north, and the Diar with him, they introduced and taught to others the arts which the people long afterwards have practised. Odin was the cleverest of all, and from him all the others learned their arts and accomplishments; and he knew them first, and knew many more than other people. But now, to tell why he is held in such high respect, we must mention various causes that contributed to it. When sitting among his friends his countenance was so beautiful and dignified, that the spirits of all were exhilarated by it, but when he was in war he appeared dreadful to his foes. This arose from his being able to change his skin and form in any way he liked. Another cause was, that he conversed so cleverly and smoothly, that all who heard believed him. He spoke everything in rhyme, such as now composed, which we call scald-craft. He and his temple priests were called song-smiths, for from them came that art of song into the northern countries. Odin could make his enemies in battle blind, or deaf, or terror-struck, and their weapons so blunt that they could no more but than a willow wand; on the other hand, his men rushed forwards without armour, were as mad as dogs or wolves, bit their shields, and were strong as bears or wild bulls, and killed people at a blow, but neither fire nor iron told upon themselves. These were called Berserker.
     Odin established the same law in his land that had been in force in Asaland. Thus he established by law that all dead men should be burned, and their belongings laid with them upon the pile, and the ashes be cast into the sea or buried in the earth. Thus, said he, every one will come to Valhalla with the riches he had with him upon the pile; and he would also enjoy whatever he himself had buried in the earth. For men of consequence a mound should be raised to their memory, and for all other warriors who had been distinguished for manhood a standing stone; which custom remained long after Odin's time. On winter day there should be blood-sacrifice for a good year, and in the middle of winter for a good crop; and the third sacrifice should be on summer day, for victory in battle. Over all Swithiod the people paid Odin a scatt or tax -- so much on each head; but he had to defend the country from enemy or disturbance, and pay the expense of the sacrifice feasts for a good year.
Odin died in his bed in Swithiod; and when he was near his death he made himself be marked with the point of a spear, and said he was going to Godheim, and would give a welcome there to all his friends, and all brave warriors should be dedicated to him; and the Swedes believed that he was gone to the ancient Asgaard, and would live there eternally. Then began the belief in Odin, and the calling upon him. The Swedes believed that he often showed to them before any great battle. To some he gave victory; others he invited to himself; and they reckoned both of these to be fortunate. Odin was burnt, and at his pile there was great splendour. It was their faith that the higher the smoke arose in the air, the higher he would be raised whose pile it was; and the richer he would be, the more property that was consumed with him. - [2]

[1] - http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/492160
[2] - http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?vis=s_e_ynglingesoga
57. Skiold, of Denmark -
Skjold, King of Denmark (0237-____) + Gefion
Some of the oldest pre-English writings tell of a strange event at the beginning of time. They say that a ship once came drifting from the great sea and landed on the Danish coast. The only living creature on board was a little boy, sleeping on a golden shield. Otherwise the ship was loaded with tools and weapons. The Danes called the boy Skjold and made him King of Denmark. During his reign Denmark flourished. When King Skjold eventually died of old age, the Danes placed him on board the same ship as he had arrived on and sent him back to the gods. This legend probably originates from ancient conceptions of the king of the sun, who sailed the arch of heaven in his ship. - [1]
     The Old English name Scylding and the Old Norse Skjöldung, meaning in both languages Shielding, refer to the members of the legendary royal family of Denmark and sometimes to their people. The name is explained in many text by the descent of this family from an eponymous king Scyld. As of today, January 2005, Scylding is the most used Germanic family name here on Ancient Worlds. Such affection for this ancient royal family is at least partially explained by its prominence in the beloved Old English poem Beowulf, and partially by the fascinating complexity of their history. According to some sources, Scyld/Skjöld is the ancestor of the kings of England and of legendary characters such as Hadding, Halfdan/Healfdene and Odin himself. Accounts, however, differ wildly, as we shall see.
     A whole saga existed about the Scyldingas/Skjoldungar, the SKJOLDUNGA SAGA. Parts of it survive in the Flatey Book and we have Arngrímur Jónsson's Latin abstract of the sögu-brot (fragment) of the Skjoldunga Saga. It says that the warlord Odin, coming from Asia, gained dominion over Northern Europe, giving Sweden to his son Yngvi and Denmark to his son Skjoldr. So the rulers of Sweden are called Ynglings and the rulers of Denmark are called Scyldings.
     There goes a great mountain barrier from north-east to south-west, which divides the Greater Swithiod from other kingdoms. South of this mountain ridge it is not far to Turkland, where Odin had great possessions. In those times the Roman chiefs went wide around in the world, subduing to themselves all people; and on this account many chiefs fled from their domains. But Odin having foreknowledge, and magic-sight, knew that his posterity would come to settle and dwell in the northern half of the world. He therefore set his brothers Ve and Vilje over Asgaard; and he himself, with all the gods and a great many other people, wandered out, first westward to Gardarike, and then south to Saxland. He had many sons; and after having subdued an extensive kingdom in Saxland, he set his sons to rule the country. He himself went northwards to the sea, and took up his abode in an island which is called Odins in Fyen. Then he sent Gefion across the sound to the north to discover new countries; and she came to King Gylve, who gave her a ploughgate of land. Then she went to Jotunheim, and bore four sons to a giant, and transformed them into a yoke of oxen. She yoked them to a plough, and broke out the land into the ocean right opposite to Odins. This land was called Sealand, and there she afterwards settled and dwelt. Skjold, a son of Odin, married her, and they dwelt at Leidre. Where the ploughed land was is a lake or sea called Laage. In the Swedish land the fjords of Laage correspond to the nesses in Sealand. Brage the Old sings of it.
     Now when Odin heard that things were in a prosperous condition in the land to the east beside Gylve; he went thither, and Gylve made a peace with him, for Gylve thought he had no strength to oppose the people of Asaland. Odin and Gylve had many tricks and enchantments against each other; but the Asaland people had always the superiority. Odin took up his residence at the Maelare lake, at the place now called Old Sigtun. There he erected a large temple, where there were sacrifices according to the customs of the Asaland people. He appropriated to himself the whole of that district, and called it Sigtun. To the temple priests he gave also domains. Njord dwelt in Noatun, Frey in Upsal, Heimdal in the Himinbergs, Thor in Thrudvang, Balder in Breidablik; to all of them he gave good estates. - [2]

[1] - http://es.geocities.com/xavialme/imagen/feroe/nordilegends.htm
[2] - http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/492160
58. Fridleif -
Friedleif Skjoldsson, King of Denmark (0259-____)
59. Fridfrod -
Frodi Friedleifsson, King of Denmark (0281-____)
60. Fridleif -
Fridleif Frodasson, King of Denmark (0303-____)
61. Havar -
Havar (The Stronghand) Fridleifsson, King of Denmark (0325-____)
62. Frodi -
Frodi Havarsson, King of Denmark (0347-____)
63. Vermand -
Vermund (The Wise) Frodasson, King of Denmark (0367-____)
64. Olaf, the Mild (married daughter of Vermand) -
Oláfr (The Humble) Vermundsson, King of Denmark (0391-____) + Danpi
65. Dan, the Proud Olafsson
66. Frodi the Peaceful -
Frodi (The Peaceful) Olafsson, King of Denmark (0433-____) + Grytha
67. Halfdan -
mistaken entry?? - brother of Fredleif (below) http://familytrees.genopro.com/Azrael/ind00817.htm
68. Fridleif -
Fredleif Frodasson, King of Denmark (0456-____)
69. Frodi, the Valiant -
Frodi (The Valiant) Fridleifsson, King of Denmark (0479-0548) -
     http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps11/ps11_126.htm
70. Halfdan -
Hálfdan Frodasson, King of Denmark (0503-0580)
The Illustrious Lineage of the Royal House of Britain", House of Skiold. Mentioned in Beowulf.
71. Helgi - Helgi and (73) Hroar were brothers, the line follows Hroar. Both mentioned in Beowulf.
Helgi Halfdansson, King of the Danes (0528-____) -
72. Rolf Kraki - ??
73. Hroar -
Hroar Halfdansson, King of Roeskilde + Ogne Princess of Northumberland
74. Valdar -
Valdar (The Mild) Hroarsson + Hildis Princess of Vandals
75. Harald -
Harald (The Old) Valdarsson, King of Roeskilde + Hildis Heidreksdatter
76. Halfdan -
Halfdan (The Violent), King of Sweden (~590-~650) + Moalda "Digri" Kinriksdatter
77. Ivar Vidfadme -
Ivar "Vidfame" Wde Fathom Skane Halfdansson, King in Sweden (~612-647) + Gauthild (Gyrithe) Alfsdatter
78. Aude, the Deep-minded -
Aud Ivarsdatter + Radbart, King of Gardarige -
79. Randver -
Randver Radbartsson, King of Uppsala (~670-770) -
Slain in the epic sea battle of Bravik. The genealogy of Haraldr is given differently in Saxo, but there can be no doubt of his historical existence. In his time it is said that the land was divided into four kingdoms—Skaane. Zealand, Fyen and jutland. After a reign of great splendour Haraldr met his death in the great battle of Brfivalla (Bravik in Ostergotland), where he was opposed by his nephew Ring, king of Sweden. The battle probably took place about the year 750. - http://64.1911encyclopedia.org/D/DE/DENMARK.htm
80. Sigurd Ring (married daughter of Randver) -
Sigurd "Ring" Randversson, King in Sweden (~720-812) + Alfhild Gandolfsdatter
81. Fronde - ??
82. Eistein - ??
83. Halfdan - son of Sigurd Ring
Halfdan "the Old"
84. Eistein (married daughter of Halfdan)
85. Ivar, Earl of Upland -
Ivar Oplaendinge, Jarl of Uplanders of Norway (~750-790) + daughter of Throndheim
86. Eistein Glumra -
Eystein Ivarsson, Jarl of Hedemarken (~800->870) + Aseda Rognvaldsdsson
Eystein Glumra, b. ca. 830, was Earl of the Upplands. According to both the Heimskringla Saga and the Orkneyinga Saga, Eystein Glumra was the father of Rognvald. The Orkneyinga Saga says Eystein Glumra's earliest forebear was Fornjot, King of Finland and Kvenland. Fornjot's great-great-grandson was Thorri, or Fhorri, who had two sons, Norr and Gorr, who emigrated westward. Norr took the mainland called Norway and Gorr took the islands. Gorr's son Heiti was the father of Sveithi (Sveide), the Sea King, who died about 760. Sveithi's son, Halfdan the Old, who died in 800, was the father of Ivar, Earl of the Uplands. And Ivar, in turn, was the father of Eystein Glumra. RC 44 calls this man Eistein Ivarsson, son of Ivar, who was son of Halfdan the Old. So it follows the Sagas for three generations. There was no written language during this period, and the Norse sagas provided oral histories, much like those Alex Haley, author of "Roots," found in Africa.
87. Rognwald, Earl of More -
Rognvald (The Wise) Eysteinsson, Count of Maer (830-890) + Ragnhild (or Hilda) Hrolfsdotter
- Also known as Count Regnvald ("the Rich") and as "The Wise", Earl of North and South More, of Raumsdale in Norway.{"Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta Barons," Carr P. Collins, Jr., Dallas, 1959, p.201-02, states that he died about 894. (Rogenwald = Regnvald = Rognald)} Earl of More/Moer in Norway and Jarl of Orkney and Shetland. He had his name Gallicized to Reginald. He supported King Harold Fairhair in an attempt to unify Norway. Norr: Jarl Rognwald (Rogvald, Raonwald, Regvald, Rouis), created Earl of Moer in 885. Roll: Rognwald, Earl of Maere. Norr: Jarl Rogwald (Raowald, Regvald, Rouis), Earl of Moer 885. Married Hilder. Beyond Rognvald, things get pretty confused. Norr has about 25 generations going back to Oden. RC doesn't agree. But some RC names coming down from RC's Odin agree in the upper portion. But the dates are some 250 years different. RC and Kraentzler agree in taking Rognvald back three more generations. Russell goes way back to Olaf the Sharp-eyed, King of Rerik.
This line has a questionable relationship (92 to 93). Here is an alternate and verified lineage from 87 to 102.
This line is presented because it is the original and widely known.
88. Rolf, Duke of Normandy -
Rollo Rognvaldsson, Duke of Normandy (846-931) + Poppa de Valois / + Gisele Caroling + (Unnamed)
Rollo was first Duke of Normandy about 911, and abdicated in 927. He was baptised in 912 in the Cathedral of Rouen. A correspondent on Prodigy states he was born about 870 in Maer, Norway, died 927-32. "Ancestral Roots..." (Balt., 1992) 121E-18: "Ganger Rolf, 'the Viking' (or Rollo), banished from Norway to the Hebrides ca. 876, 890 participated in Viking attack on Bayeux, where Count Berenger of Bayeux was killed, and his dau. Poppa captured and taken, 886, by Rollo (now called Count of Rouen) as his 'Danish' wife. Under Treaty of St. Claire, 911, rec'd the Duchy of Normandy from Charles III, 'the Simple'; d. ca. 927 (Isenburg says 931), bur. Notre Dame, Rouen." Viking Leader 911-927. "Rolf the Ganger" of Norway, "Marching Rolf" or "Rollo the Dane". Defeated Normandy in 911. After invading northwest France, Rollon (Rollo) seized Rouen and the land surrounding it and Charles the Simple granted him part of Neustria. Rollo then embrace Christianity and became ruler of Normandy. He was known as "The Dane", 1st Duke of Normandy. Yeilded homage for his Dukedom to Charles the Simple, King of France. Source: LDS Ancestral File; Kings, Rulers and Statesmen, p 132; Haydn's Book of Dignities, p 30 TITL the Viking, the Ganger Rollo the Viking was granted land in Northwestern France in 911 AD by Charles the Simple, King of France. Charles hoped that Rollo would defend his new land, barring the length of the Seine River to other Viking groups. Rollo remained faithful to Charles and he and his son quickly expanded the original land grant at the expense of neighboring French lords and guarded it well against Viking rivals. Even before Rollo's grandson Richard took over the domain in 942, the descendants of the Vikings had accepted Christianity, intermarried with the local population and adopted the French language. Already they were being called Normans, a contraction of Northmen, and there territory became known as Normandy. Richard's great-grandson was King William I, conqueror of England. Rollo was also known as "Rolf." SOUR Microsoft Encarta 1994 ed. SOUR Freeman, Marsha Colleen (Scully) (Rec# 435). "Buell Genealogy" pub. 1 Dec 1978. Chart #34 SOUR Taut, Anne. "The Kings and Queens of Great Britain" pub by Elm Tree Books/Hamish Hamilton Ltd. Great Britain.//; Buell001.zip
The Lions in the arms of England: They are three Lions passant guardant, i.e. walking and showing the full face. The first Lion was that of Rollo, Duke of Normandy, and the second represented the country of Maine, which was added to Normandy. These were the two Lions borne by William the Conqueror and his descendants. Henry II added a third Lion to represent the Duchy of Aquitaine, which came to him through his wife Eleanor.
89. William Longsword I, Duke of Normandy - Guillaume I (Longue Epaee)
William Longsword, Duke of Normandy (~900-943) + Asperleng of Vaudreuil / + Sprota (or Espriota) de St. Liz
For William and his ancestry see "Falaise Roll...," M. Jackson Crispin and Leonce Macary (London: Butler & Tanner, 1938, Table IV at end of volume). He was murdered on the island of Picquigny in the Somme. References: [Weis1],[ES],[RFC],[AR7],[RoyalAAF]
90. Richard I, the Fearless, 3rd Duke of Normandy -
Richard I (The Fearless) 3rd Duke of Normandy (933-996) + Gonnor de Crepon Duchess of Normandy / + Papia / + (Unnamed) -
Weis' "Ancestral Roots. . ." (39:22), (119:24), (121E:20), (177:3), (214:22), (235:19), (250:20). "RICHARD I, "the Fearless", Duke of Normandy, b. Fecamp ca. 933, named father's h. 29 May 942, d. 20 Nov. 996; m. (1) (Danish wife) GUNNOR, d. 1027 or 1031, dau. of the forester of Arques, but betrothed ca. 945 & event. m. (2) 960 to Emma, d. ca. 968, dau. HUGH CAPET ..., Count of Paris. After Emma's death, m. (Christian marriage) GUNNOR to legit. their children. " Cokayne's "Complete Peerage" (Appendix D to v.VII, p.711), identifies him
as father of ROBERT, COUNT OF EVREUX. Stuart's "Royalty For Commoners" (166:33). From Rosamond McKitterick.s, "The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians 751-987", London & NY (Longman) 1983, pp. 238-239: "When in 942 WILLIAM was murdered at the instigation of COUNT ARNULF OF FLANDERS (RIN 2173), his son Richard, still a minor, succeeded him. LOUIS IV (RIN 1617) and HUGH THE GREAT (RIN 1206) each tried to sieze Normandy, and LOUIS took charge of Richard. He then ensconced himself at Rouen and HUGH took Bayeux, which still had a Scandinavian leader called Sictric. Richard escaped from his custody at Laon, retook Rouen, and called on another Viking leader, Harald of the Bassin, for help. The Normans under Richard were able to re-establish their autonomy and from 947 Richard governed in relative peace. In 965 he swore allegiance to the Carolingian king Lothar [son of LOUIS IV] at Gisors. Richard's official marriage was to Emma, daughter of HUGH THE GREAT; they had no children, but by his common-law wife GUNNOR, a Dane, he had many. RICHARD II, son of GUNNOR and Richard I, succeeded his father in 996, another son Robert was archbishop of Rouen from 989 to 1037 and EMMA their daughter became queen of England on her marriage to AETHELREAD, a position she maintained after his death in 1016 by marrying Knut. GUNNOR's nephews and other relatives furthermore formed the core of the new aristocracy which developed in the course of the eleventh century. Unfortunately we know little about the internal organization and history of Normandy until the reign of RICHARD II." From "Predatory Kinship and the Creation of Norman Power, 840-1066" by Eleanor Searle, University of California Press, 1988: "The Acknowledged Children of Richard I: Sons. The most revealing evidence of the prestige and power of Richard and his successor is to be found in the endowments and marriages of their children. The wife
whose Norseness and high status made her an acceptable equal in the eyes of his chieftains was a woman whose children commanded paternal recognition, for they would have powerful maternal kinsmen upon whose loyalty they could call. Even so, it is remarkable that Dudo, with GUNNOR at his side, tells the reader only the number of children she bore Richard: five boys and three girls. He does not give their names, and Richard's sons defy full identification. RICHARD II was certainly GUNNOR's son, as was his virtual coruler, Robert, archbishop of Rouen. Charters identify their relationship clearly, but they do not identify any of her husband's other sons as GUNNOR's...." (p. 132, see below for source) "Richard I and his new settler -in-laws of the 960s were the winners who lasted. In becoming so they learned (and taught) two principles of success that marked them off from the Franks. They learned the value of a strong centralizing chieftain who could at least freeze the status quo once his own local chieftains had taken what they wanted. The more successful he was, the more chiefs attached themselves to him for just this: with his warranty, backed by his chieftains, their defeated enemies could not recover by violence what had been taken from them by violence. Thus were the Norman dukes 'settlers of quaarrels.' Fearlessness was the necessary quality in such a corrdinating chieftain, and Richard I, who has no encomiast of his deeds, has at least this sobriquet, "the Fearless" Those who were great fighters and the ruthlessly, selectively violent, were the great centralizers among the threatened and rapacious Norse." During the minority of his (WILLIAM LONG-SWORD) successor, Duke Richard, KING LOUIS IV, who was making an expedition into Normandy, was captured by the inhabitants of Rouen and handed over to HUGH THE
GREAT. From this time onwards the dukes of Normandy began to enter into relations with the dukes of France; and in 958 Duke Richard married HUGH THE GREAT's daughter. He died in 996. (Succeeded by RICHARD II.)
91. Richard II, the Good, 4th Duke of Normandy -
Richard II (The Good), Duke of Normandy (~958-1026) + Judith of Brittany / + Papia (Pope) de Normandy / + (Unnamed)
92. Robert, Duke of Normandy -
Robert (The Devil), Duke of Normandy (~1000-1035) + Herleve (Harlette) of Falaise
On the death of his father (1026/27), Robert contested the duchy with his elder brother Richard III, legally the heir, until the latter's opportune death a few years later. A strong ruler, Robert succeeded in exacting the obedience of his vassals. On the death of Robert II the Pious, king of France (1031), a crisis arose over the succession to the French throne. The Duke gave his support to Henry I against the party favouring his younger brother; in reward for his services he demanded and received the Vexin Français, a territory not far north of Paris. A patron of the monastic reform movement, he died while returning from a pilgrimage to Jerusalem.
     Robert I was Duke 1028-35. His wife is Estrith, sister of Canute the Great (no issue). Robert was called "Robert the Devil", accused of poisoning his brother (whom Robert succeeded as Duke); he sheltered the exiled English princes, Edward and Alfred; he died returning from a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. References: [RFC],[Weis1],[Paget1],[MRL],[AR7],[CP]
93. Drogo de Montacute -
     brother of William de Normandie "The Conqueror" (Duke) of NORMANDY (1027-1087) -
     http://webtree.com/seaellen/NHFetterly-Tree/Robert-II-The-Devil-Duke-Of-Normandy
http://fabpedigree.com/s092/f004378.htm
Drogo de Monteacuto (~1040-~1086) - also Drogo de Monte-Acuto; Montague ancestors have been traced to the Mountains of Scandinavia as early as the fifth century. No one knows when nor from where they came to Scandinavia, but it must have been several hundred years before. Drogo de Monte-Acuto was a descendant of the Northman Rollo the Dane from Scandanavia who settled Normandy. French spelling of his name was Drogo de Montagu. He preferred the Latin Drogo de Monte-Acuto which means Dragon of the Mountain Peak. He came to England with Robert Earl of Morton and his brother "William the Conquerer". With sixty thousand men and over three hundred ships they landed at Pevensey upon the coast of Sussex, late in September, 1066, and immediately burned and scuttled their ships that their only hope might lie in their courage and resolution, their only safety in victory. This marked the advent of the first Montague upon the shores of England, and as he marches on toward the plain near Hastings (where, upon the 14th of October, the battle of Hastings was fought and won), we note that he bears the kite shaped shield of the Norman invador, its color is cerulean blue, and upon it is the full length figure of a Griffin, segreant (rampant with wings spread), and painted a bright golden hue. This was the original Coat of Arms of the Montagues in England.
    
http://www.montaguemillennium.com/history/montague/america/montamer.htm#IX
     http://www.slumberland.org/gene/ps03/ps03_303.htm
William Montacute - ?? http://web.ukonline.co.uk/mattb/cvstudy/montague.html#I
Drogo de Montagu (~1073-~1125)
Richard de Montagu (~1135-~1166) + Alice
94. William de Montacute -
William de Montagu (~1145-~1217) + Isabel
Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset
http://martinrealm.org/genealogy/montacute.htm
95. Drue de Montacute, Jr. -
Drew (Dru) de Montagu, Lord of Talbot (~1178-<1216) + Aline (Alicia) de Basset daughter of Alan Basset, lord of Wycombe, and Alina de Gai
96. William de Montacute -
William de Montagu (1206-1270) + Beota (Bertha)
97. William de Montacute - ?? listed http://web.ukonline.co.uk/mattb/cvstudy/montague.html#I
98. William de Montacute  -?? listed http://web.ukonline.co.uk/mattb/cvstudy/montague.html#I
99. Sir Simon de Montague (or Montacute) -
Simon de Montagu, Baron Montagu (1250-1316) + Hawaise de Saint Amand daughter of Amaury or Amalric de St. Amand + Isabel
100. William de Montague -
Sir William de Montagu, Baron Montagu 2nd Lord (~1275-1320) + Elizabeth de Montfort Baroness Montagu daughter of Peter (Piers) de Montfort of Beaudesert
101. Sir William De Montague -
William de Montagu, Earl of Salisbury (1301-1344) + Catherine de Grandison
William, King of Man, 1st Earl of Sal MONTACUTE  -
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jes1&id=I1683
English soldier, born 3rd Baron Montagu (Montacute). He was created 1st earl of Salisbury by King Edward III in 1337 as a reward for his services during the invasion of Scotland. Salisbury was marshal of England in 1338 and was instrumental in winning the Isle of Man from Scottish control around 1340.
Catherine was daughter of William de Grandison and Sybil Tregoz. She is supposed to be the lady whose dropped garter inspired Edward III to create the The Most Noble Order of the Garter - http://martinrealm.org/genealogy/montacute.htm
Daughter Philippa De Montagu married Roger De Mortimer and gave birth to Edmund "The Good" De Mortimer who married Philippa Plantagenet, who was the granddaughter of King Edward III (Plantagenet).
102. William de Montague - This child not the connection
William Montagu, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (1328-1397)
English soldier and nobleman. Montagu (also called Montacute) was the son of William Montagu, 1st earl of Salisbury. Montagu fought with distinction at the Battle of Crécy in 1346 and the Battle of Poitiers in 1356 during the Hundred Years’ War (1337-1453) with France. He was one of the original 24 knights of the Order of the Garter, which was founded by King Edward III of England in 1348. In 1381 Montagu accompanied King Richard II when he met with the rebel Wat Tyler, leader of Tyler’s Rebellion against Richard II’s poll tax.

Montagu left no heirs, and on his death the title passed to his nephew, John Montagu, a Lollard who was killed during the anti-Lollard persecutions of Henry IV.

- - - lost connection - - - connection found !!

Sir John de Montagu (1327-1389) + Margaret de Monthermer  daughter of Thomas, 2nd Lord de Monthermer               - this child is the connection
1st Lord Montacute
John Montagu (1350-1400) + Maude Francis daughter of Adam Francis, Lord Mayor of London
Sir John de Montacute, KG, 3rd Earl of Salisbury
active in Parliament, diplomat on several missions to Scotland and France, Keeper of Trowbridge Castle, and the only high-ranking noble who remained loyal to Richard II during and after Bolingbroke's coup. As one of the leaders of the 1399-1400 rebellion against Henry IV, he was beheaded in January 1400.
Montacute had to answer charges related to the arrest and subsequent death of the Duke of Gloucester in 1397. Eventually he was released, due to the intercession of King Henry's sister Elizabeth, Countess of Huntingdon. Not long after his release, Montacute joined with the Earl of Huntingdon and others in the Epiphany Rising, a plot to kill King Henry IV and restore Richard II. After the plot failed, he was caught at Cirencester and executed. His eldest son, Thomas – by Maud Francis daughter of London citizen, Adam Francis – eventually recovered the earldom, though the attainder against John Montacute was not reversed until the accession of Edward IV in 1461.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Montacute,_3rd_Earl_of_Salisbury
Richard Montacute (1389-____)
Son of John and Maude
    http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/i/s/t/Willy-A-Istvan/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0148.html
    http://www.daveweaverfamily.com/dave/a22.htm
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jes1&id=I1378
    http://www.stirnet.com/main/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=79&startUrl=http://www.stirnet.com/HTML/genie/british/mm4fz/montfortXX.htm
Brother of Thomas
    http://www.luminarium.org/encyclopedia/montacute.htm
Edward Montague (1435-1529)
Robert Montague I (1455-1520)
103. William Montague -
William Montague I (1485-1555) + Joan Grow
     end of upward search from Erven Elmer Brundage and Hyrum Moroni
104. Robert Montague -
Robert Montague II (1528-1575) + Margaret Cotton
105. William Montague -
William Montague II (1548-1594) + Margaret Malthus
106. Peter Montague -
Peter of Boveney Montague I (1580-1638) + Eleanor (Helen) Allen
3GG of George Washington, 1st President of the United States of America
107. Richard Montague -
Richard Montague (1614-1681) + Abigail Downing
108. Mary Montague (married Joseph Warriner) -
Mary Montague (1642-1689) + Joseph Warringer
109. Hannah Warriner (married Robert Pease, Jr.) -
Hannah Warringer (1674-1774) + Robert Pease
110. Bethia Pease (married Samuel Meacham) -
Bethia Pease (1709-1778) + Samuel I. Mecham (1712-1754)
111. Samuel Mecham -
Samuel Meacham (1739-1811) +  Phoebe Main
112. Joshua Mecham -
Joshua Mecham (1773-1846) + Permelia Chapman
113. Ephriam Mecham -
Ephraim Meacham (1808-1891) + Polly Derby

                                                                                Two of Ephriam's children were Emma and Hyrum.

114. Emma Mecham -
Emma Maria Meacham (1840-1923) + William Brown (Broom) Hill
   
http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/frameset_search.asp?
     PAGE=/eng/search/ancestorsearchresults.asp
Hyrum Mecham -
Hyrum Moroni Meacham (1842-1917) + Sarah Ann Stevens /+ Louisa Jane Kirby
    
http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/frameset_search.asp?
     PAGE=/eng/search/ancestorsearchresults.asp
115. Polly Derby -
Polly Jeannette Hill (1866-1954) + William Grafton Brundage
     http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/frameset_search.asp?
     PAGE=/eng/search/ancestorsearchresults.asp
Franklin Mecham -
Franklin Moroni Mecham (1876-1958) + Sarah Ann Shirts
     http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/frameset_search.asp?
     PAGE=/eng/search/ancestorsearchresults.asp
116. Erven Brundage -
Erven Elmer Brundage (1890-1974) + Grace Melissa Lamb + Ruth Leannah Fox
    
http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/frameset_search.asp?
     PAGE=/eng/search/ancestorsearchresults.asp
Fay Mecham -
Fay LeRoy Mecham (1915-2002) + Delta Mae Stose
    
http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/frameset_search.asp?
     PAGE=/eng/search/ancestorsearchresults.asp
117. Shirley Brundage
Shirley Ann Brundage (1926-) + Joseph Callis Knight (1927-1999)
Arnold Mecham
Arnold LeRoy Mecham + Jeanne Ann Williams + Faye + Debbie + Karen
118. Kelly Knight (1959-) Nadine Mecham (1963-)